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Shinto Shrine and Lanterns

Laser cut MDF terrain from Blotz were the catalyst required to weather some existing terrain a little and to take a few more photos.
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Paddy Fields, Multibases and Add-Ons.

Terrain and play aids for samurai gaming, primarily suited to Test of Honour. Continue reading

Test of Honour – Tested

PB and I got together for a weekend of testing each others honour with 28mm feudal Japanese miniatures.

Ancestry was besmirched, heads were divorced from bodies and many, many vocal impersonations of the sound of arterial spray filled the gaming dojo.

Samples of appropriate arterial spray sounds impersonated can be found in the clip of research material above.

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Bamboo groves

Stylised scenic set dressing for heroic, poignant and honourable duelling and philosophising.

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Knavecon 2017: Dragon Rampant


A handful of my gaming buddies and I got together at Knavecon recently.  Amongst other things, our Dragons Rampaged. Continue reading

Kurîpu Jima: Buildings and Sakura

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Once I started painting my Shonen Knives I was soon enjoying it enough to realise that I needed to get some similarly themed terrain.  Kurîpu Jima became the plan.

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Kuripu Jima

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Mr Saturday and I have a weekend of hot, sweaty fimir on ninja action planned.  I set up the table this evening and took a couple of snaps.

The terrain is from my expanding pseudo feudal Japanese set, planned to represent the Shonen Knives stomping grounds.  I need a few more elements before I will be entirely happy with it, but considering that a couple of months ago it was nothing, Im still rather pleased.

I plan to go into a bit more detail on the various elements at a later date, but for now I am pleased enough to stick up a couple of photos.

Tengus eye view.

Tengus eye view.

Im not sure that feudal Japan looked quite as suburban as that though.  The fences dont look right and the paddy fields might not make sense their either.  Guidance from those more knowledgeable than I am would be appreciated.

From the 4Ground site (where the fences came from):

“In Shogunate Japan taxes were paid in ‘Koku’ (the rice needed to feed one man for one year), and for this reason ‘Bei’ rice was grown in ‘Ta’ wet paddy fields all over Japan.

During the shogunate period rice was grown in every ‘Mura’ (village), in open wet fields called ‘Ta’, though almost all the rice harvested went towards paying the village tax burden. For themselves villagers grew beans along the edges of the raised paths between their ‘Ta’ fields. They also grew fruit in their small fenced orchards, vegetables in their fenced gardens and other crops were grown in ‘Hatake’ (dry fields), often these dry fields were fenced.

In their gardens villagers grew vegetables according to the region and season, fruit such as oranges, grapes, and cherry as well as plant materials like mulberry, tea and bamboo were grown in their orchards. Village gardens and orchards were fenced by ‘Mura Mokusei no Kade’ (village wooden walls). The dry crop fields were fenced with ‘Mokusei no Kade’ (wooden walls). In these dry fields wheat and millet were grown for their food, cotton and hemp were grown for weaving to make their common folk clothing; as any silk harvested by the villages was only worn by samurai families and the richest of ‘Chonin’ (Townsman).

Village gardens and orchards were fenced by ‘Mura Mokusei no Kade’ (village wooden walls), their village gateways were known as ‘Mura Mokuzo-Mon’. Sometimes if a ripening crop had a particular high value one or two ‘Mizunomi’ (farm labourers) would be posted at the gateway as ‘Moto’ (village gate men) to watch for rogues and thieves.”

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